Holly Hovan

Content from this Writer

woundwound assessment - skin tear on arm assessment - skin tear on arm
April 25th, 2018

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN-ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

After determining our goals of wound treatment (healing, maintaining, or comfort/palliative), we need to choose a treatment that meets the needs of the wound and the patient.

The Importance of Palliative Care
April 5th, 2018

by Holly Hovan MSN, APRN-ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As wound care clinicians, one of the first steps we take after meeting our patient and assessing their wound is identifying our treatment goals. Much like managing a complex medical problem, we need to identify if our goals of care are...

fistula management
February 15th, 2018

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A fistula is an abnormal opening between two areas that typically shouldn't be connected, or with an epithelialized tract. An example is an opening from the bowel to the abdominal wall, termed enteroatmospheric or enterocutaneous (the terms are...

patient repositioning
January 11th, 2018

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Friction and shear… what’s the difference and how do they cause pressure injuries? Are wounds caused by friction and shear classified as pressure injuries? What’s the easiest way to explain the differences between these critical components of...

patient mobility and activity
December 14th, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

The Braden category of activity focuses on how much (or how little) the resident can move independently. A resident can score from 1 to 4 in this category, 1 being bedfast and 4 being no real limitations. It is important to keep in mind that...

enteral nutrition feeding
November 16th, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A common misconception by nurses is sometimes predicting nutritional status based on a resident's weight. Weight is not always a good predictor of nutritional status. Nutritional status is determined by many factors and by looking at the big...

Moisture on Skin
October 25th, 2017

When nurses hear the term moisture, they usually almost always think of urinary or fecal incontinence, or both. There are actually several other reasons why a patient could be moist. Continued moisture breaks down the skin, especially when the pH of the aggravating agent is lower (urine, stomach...

peroperative ostomy siting
October 4th, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

When marking a patient for a stoma, it is important to consider the practice based on evidence acquired by the WOC nurse during training and experience. Stoma siting procedures are based on evidence-based practices. As Mahoney (2015) discusses,...

neuropathy testing for sensory perception (Braden Scale)
September 13th, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As wound care professionals, the Braden Scale is near and dear to our hearts. With that in mind, our evidence-based tool needs to be used correctly in order to yield accurate results. Working with long-term care and geriatric populations opens...

comparison
August 3rd, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As wound care clinicians, we are aware that part of the process of consulting requires a comprehensive wound assessment, looking at wound characteristics, causative factors, and drainage. As I've previously mentioned, we've all heard the term, "...

elderly patient skin tear prevention
June 29th, 2017

Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin...

Calciphylaxis
June 2nd, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

In patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), there is a decreased renal clearance that causes an increase in phosphorus, then calcium, in the body. Elevation of these two electrolytes causes the parathyroid gland to secrete...

staff education in wound care
May 19th, 2017

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

As I am sure we are all well aware, not everyone loves wounds, ostomies, and continence as much as we do. Some nurses just do not have the passion (or desire) to perform wound care and learn about different modalities. On the other hand...

wound care education
April 13th, 2017

by Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP
Unit specific, evidence-based training and continued follow up are integral to the success of our pressure injury prevention program. The unit-based skin care nurses (UBSCNs) are at the frontline of prevention, along with all nursing...