Wound Management

Holly Hovan's picture
woundwound assessment - skin tear on arm assessment - skin tear on arm

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN-ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

After determining our goals of wound treatment (healing, maintaining, or comfort/palliative), we need to choose a treatment that meets the needs of the wound and the patient.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
wound debridement instruments

by The WoundSource Editors

There are five types of non-selective and selective debridement methods, but many factors determine what method will be most effective for your patient.1 Determining the debridement method is based not only on the wound presentation and evaluation, but also on the patient's history and physical examination. Looking at the "whole patient, not only the hole in the patient," is a valuable quote to live by as a wound care clinician. Ask yourself or your patient these few questions: Has the patient had a previous chronic wound history? Is your patient compliant with the plan of care? Who will be performing the dressing changes? Are there economic factors that affect the treatment plan? Take the answers to these questions into consideration when deciding on debridement methods.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Chronic Wound Tissue

by The WoundSource Editors

To witness the normal wound healing process is extraordinary. However, the systematic process of healing is not always perfect. Chronic wounds are complex and present an immense burden in health care. Identifying the wound etiology is important, but an accurate wound assessment is just as important. The color, consistency, and texture of wound tissue will lead you to the most appropriate wound management plan.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Lidocaine Chemical Makeup

by Aletha Tippett MD

Well known for its pain-relieving properties, lidocaine can help us with wound care in many other ways. It has been my go-to product for wound care for over 20 years. I always use viscous lidocaine squirted on any dressing. The viscous lidocaine is what is prescribed for people to gargle for sore throats, so I always knew it was safe to put on a wound. It is wonderful for pain relief. A patient might need systemic pain relief also, but the application of topical lidocaine is very effective to help alleviate local pain of wounds.

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Holly Hovan's picture
fistula management

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

A fistula is an abnormal opening between two areas that typically shouldn't be connected, or with an epithelialized tract. An example is an opening from the bowel to the abdominal wall, termed enteroatmospheric or enterocutaneous (the terms are sometimes used interchangeably) because this fistula is exposed to the atmosphere, or is open from the abdomen to the skin, and typically needs to be pouched or some type of containment of the effluent.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

In celebrating the 20th anniversary of WoundSource, we would like to acknowledge the support of our readership. The WoundSource Reader Profile Series shares the stories behind our readers and how WoundSource currently impacts their wound care practices.

Karen Zulkowski, DNS, RN

Wound Course Instructor, Excelsior College
Executive Editor, JWCET
Associate Professor at Montana State University-Bozeman & Wound Care Researcher (Retired)

WoundSource Editors's picture
Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS is the Coordinator of Wound Management at Patience Home Health Care in San Antonio, Texas. He has been working in the wound care field for nearly 20 years, helping countless patients, teaching wound care best practices, and improving standards at his care facility. His career has demonstrated an extraordinary passion for patient care, a commitment to doing the right thing, and a strong faith.

Martin Vera's picture
venous assessment

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound clinicians across the nation (and the world) are commonly faced with the difficult task of managing lower extremity wounds. Lower extremity wounds come in many different forms. We are not faced with a generic type, but several—in fact, we never know what we'll be presented with day-to-day.

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Martin Vera's picture
wound healing

by Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

It is simply mind blowing how meticulous and intricate our bodies were created and how it responds through adversity and of course, simple wear and tear. When our body experiences injury and our skin gets altered or wounded, it starts a cascade of events within the body that masterfully react to the situation at hand and takes care of the damage, allowing the healing process begins

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
high touch patient care

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

My last blog discussed the need to be high touch in a high-tech environment. This generated a lot of discussion among readers. Everyone agreed 'high touch' is important, but wondered what can we do to actually create that environment in all clinical settings?

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