Surgical Site Infection

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Surgeon Changing Gloves

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGNCS-BC, CWCN-AP, CWS, RNFA, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most frequent complications in colorectal surgery procedures, with the documented incidence in literature ranging from 3% to 30%. (And, as we discussed in a previous installment, patient-specific risk factors can be the most challenging to control.) In response to these data, the American College of Surgeons and The Joint Commission’s Center for Transforming Healthcare launched a collaborative effort in 2012 to reduce colorectal SSIs.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Site Infections

by the WoundSource Editors

Of the millions of surgical procedures performed annually, most surgical site wounds heal without complications. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common complications that may occur after surgery, and that may delay healing, therefore increasing the cost of care.1

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Hy-Tape International's picture
wound dressing securement - infection prevention

by Hy-Tape International

To promote rapid healing, improve patient comfort, and prevent complications, it is important that health care professionals actively work to prevent infection. One key component of that effort is wound dressing securement. Secure, gentle, and effective dressings can help prevent the ingress of foreign material, reduce damage during dressing changes, and help foster an ideal healing environment. This can help reduce the risk of infection, thereby improving patient outcomes and lowering costs. In this post, we explore the importance of infection prevention and effective dressing securement strategies to help prevent infection.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Great news! Data suggest that surgical site infection (SSI) incidence could be halved with implementation of evidence-based interventions. So, why are interventions not ubiquitously utilized across health care institutions and SSIs not nearly eradicated?

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
preventing-surgical-site-infections

By Samantha Kuplicki MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Identifying the presence of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) is an important, basic skill for the wound specialist, and even more essential is understanding how to apply evidence-based, risk-reducing interventions. SSIs are particularly problematic because of the multiple factors contributing to their development, including those that are directly patient-related (modifiable or non-modifiable), and non-patient related (facility, procedure, pre-op, intra-op, and post-op). Due to the multifaceted nature of SSIs, we must address specific issues simultaneously in order to successfully reduce the patient’s risk.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20% of total documented infections each year and costing approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, patient morbidity and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.

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