Blogs

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

One fourth of the approximately 22.3 million patients with diabetes in the United States are expected to develop a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) at some point during their lives, and it is estimated to affect 1-8% of diabetics annually. DFUs have shown to be challenging to treat, and often result in extended hospital stays, increased risk of infection, and subsequent amputation in certain patients. A major concern regarding amputees is a 5-year mortality rate that rivals that of patients with colon cancer. In addition, DFUs contribute heavily to the financial load of payers, with an estimated annual medical cost of up to $13 billion.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
the lymphatic system

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

When I talk to my patients with lymphedema, I often need to tell them about their lymphatic system. Beyond knowing of lymph nodes or glands in their neck, most don't recall having heard anything about it. Surprisingly, today's medical students often have less than one hour on the lymphatic system education in medical school.

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Thomas Serena's picture
Wound Care Clinical Trials

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

A recent article by Kaiser Health News misquoted me as saying that we enroll only "healthy" patients in our clinical trials. At moments like this, one feels that something has been overlooked. One of my research coordinators, recalling the serious adverse events (SAEs) of the previous week said, "The only patients sicker than ours are underground."

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Martin Vera's picture
diabetic foot ulcer

By Martin D. Vera LVN, CWS

In this last of our three-part series on lower extremity wounds, we will focus our attention to diabetic foot/neuropathic ulcers. Research indicates that the United States national average for diabetes mellitus (DM) accounts for a little over 8% of the nation, or roughly over 18 million Americans afflicted with this disease—what the industry refers to "the silent killer" for the amount of damage it causes. DM has the capacity to affect vision and circulation, as well as increase the incidence of stroke and renal disease, just to name a few associated problems. Over 20% of individuals with diabetes will develop ulcerations, with a recurrence rate of over 50% for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) alone. Overall, lower extremity wounds have recurrence rate of 40-90%. We have our work cut out for us. So, let's put our deuces up, recognize early intervention, and try our best to manage and prevent complications associated with DM.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Chronic wounds and ulcerations induced by complications associated with diabetes mellitus have proven to be a burden to the patients themselves, as well as the healthcare system as a whole. This burden has required physicians to not only find interventions that work better, but are also more cost effective. In the population with diabetes, 1 out of 4 will have an ulceration of the lower extremity at some point in their life. It’s also important to state that these foot ulcers can lead to some form of amputation in 20% of these patients. Standard wound care typically involves moist dressings, debridement, wound offloading, infection control, and in some cases, advanced therapies. The authors of this study looked into two of these advanced therapies, bioengineered skin substitutes (BSS) and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membranes (dHACM.) The primary objective of the study was to see which worked best, as compared to standard wound care (SWC), while the secondary objective was to see which had the lowest costs.

Catherine Milne's picture
innovation

By Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, BC-ANP, CWOCN-AP

Our New England village has an annual tradition that takes place on the town green. These two acres of well-manicured grass have historically been central to the fabric of the hamlet. Every Memorial Day, members of the fifth grade class assemble on the steps of one of the town's oldest buildings to recite the Gettysburg Address. With parents, grandparents, and residents looking toward the cherub-faced innocents, they deliver, "Fourscore and seven years ago..."

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Holly Hovan's picture
comparison

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As wound care clinicians, we are aware that part of the process of consulting requires a comprehensive wound assessment, looking at wound characteristics, causative factors, and drainage. As I've previously mentioned, we've all heard the term, "a dry cell is a dead cell." However, not all wounds are dry.

Janet Wolfson's picture
compression therapy for lymphedema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

The intersection of wounds and lymphedema has been on my mind this week as challenging patients and a new reduction garment cross my dual specialty life.

Margaret Heale's picture
dressing removal

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wounds are dressed every day, and much goes into the choices that are made to properly apply wound dressings. The condition of the periwound skin should be a major factor in the decisions made, as injuring this area can extend the wound and cause considerable pain. Tape removal is one of the most painful areas of wound care.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
wound care slide presentation

by Jeanne Cunningham, Founder of WoundSource

After seeing about 100 pictures of wounds, I was beginning to feel sick. The year was 1985 and there I was, a recent college graduate in my 20s, sitting in a cramped office at the Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester, PA, watching slide after slide of feet, elbows, legs, bottoms, in fact, every part of the human body with open, colorful wounds.

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