Blogs

Susan Cleveland's picture
Preventing MASD by Moving

by Susan Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

The long-term care setting has changed over the years: it has become an even more concerning issue because our population is no longer just older adults looking for a place to age, but now includes a wave of acutely ill individuals with multiple comorbidities. And yet despite these changes, skin issues continue to be a problem. Moisture from any source increases the skin’s permeability and decreases the barrier function. The outmost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, is normally slightly acidic and protects the body from pathogens when intact. If the skin is compromised by moisture or moisture with friction, a break in the surface can allow pathogens to enter.

Blog Category: 
Janet Wolfson's picture
Lymphedema patients doing yoga

by Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

For a long time, it was debated whether patients with lymphedema should partake in an exercise regimen. Today, fears of overloading the lymphatic system and of causing injuries have been resolved by research findings; however, there are precautions to take, and some types of exercise are more beneficial than others. When done correctly, these exercises can improve strength, quality of life, and ability to care for oneself and others, increase range of motion, decrease pain, and even reduce edema. Lymphedema-specific programs have been developed by wonderfully creative and knowledgeable people, too. As always, patients must consult with a health care provider before embarking on a new exercise regimen. If you are managing a patient who lacks strength or full range of motion, has difficulty in daily activities, or has problems walking, therapists can help develop a safe program and improve deficits to work up to a recreational exercise program.

Blog Category: 
Margaret Heale's picture
Wound Research Data Review Including Outliers

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

When looking at randomized controlled trials one of the first things you read is a one liner, "subjects were matched," and there may be a list that includes stage of pressure injury, size of wound, age, sex, and a myriad of other things somebody decided to include. There may also be exclusion criteria such as uncontrolled blood sugar, obesity, and being over 60 years old. It makes sense to do this, and there is no doubt that once you have got homogenous groups and compare the outcome of one with another, after whatever intervention you wish to discover the worth of, the result may look gratifyingly convincing.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
wound care and legal issues

by Aletha Tippett MD

Medical providers, and especially wound care providers, seem to always be under the looming shadow of lawsuits and legal issues. I have written about this before, but it continues to be an issue as I receive requests for legal reviews repeatedly. I have read many charts for legal reviews, and it actually is very straightforward to avoid or mitigate any legal problems.

Blog Category: 
Holly Hovan's picture
woundwound assessment - skin tear on arm assessment - skin tear on arm

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN-ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

After determining our goals of wound treatment (healing, maintaining, or comfort/palliative), we need to choose a treatment that meets the needs of the wound and the patient.

Blog Category: 
Hy-Tape International's picture
exudate management

By Hy-Tape International

Chronic venous insufficiency disease and resulting venous leg ulcers are serious and common conditions, particularly among older adults. More than half of lower extremity ulcers are caused by venous insufficiency disease. In a diseased venous system, the patient’s venous pressure will not be reduced on ambulation. This sustained pressure can lead to venous ulcerations and other complications.1,2

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
wound debridement instruments

by The WoundSource Editors

There are five types of non-selective and selective debridement methods, but many factors determine what method will be most effective for your patient.1 Determining the debridement method is based not only on the wound presentation and evaluation, but also on the patient's history and physical examination. Looking at the "whole patient, not only the hole in the patient," is a valuable quote to live by as a wound care clinician. Ask yourself or your patient these few questions: Has the patient had a previous chronic wound history? Is your patient compliant with the plan of care? Who will be performing the dressing changes? Are there economic factors that affect the treatment plan? Take the answers to these questions into consideration when deciding on debridement methods.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Chronic Wound Tissue

by The WoundSource Editors

To witness the normal wound healing process is extraordinary. However, the systematic process of healing is not always perfect. Chronic wounds are complex and present an immense burden in health care. Identifying the wound etiology is important, but an accurate wound assessment is just as important. The color, consistency, and texture of wound tissue will lead you to the most appropriate wound management plan.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Healing

by The WoundSource Editors

There are four stages of wound healing. This systematic process moves in a linear direction. The four stages of wound healing are: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. It is imperative to remember that wound healing is not linear. It is possible for a patient to move forward or backward through the wound healing phases due to intrinsic and extrinsic forces.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Selecting a Debridement Method

by The WoundSource Editors

Debridement is essential to promote healing and prevent infection. There are five main types of debridement methods. BEAMS is the common mnemonic to remember all types: biological, enzymatic, autolytic, mechanical, and surgical. In recent years, new types of debridement technology have been introduced, such as fluid jet technology, ultrasound debridement therapy, hydrosurgery, and monofilament polyester fiber pad debridement.

Blog Category: